HeWe know readers have various questions regarding Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program. We decided to set up this Social Security Disability SSDI FAQs to address the most common questions we get.

The Frequently Asked Questions page is a resource for the SSDI program, covering highly searched topics, including:

  • What is the difference between SSI and SSDI?
  • Can Social Security take away my SSDI benefits?
  • Can you receive both SSI and SSDI at the same time?

More questions will be added as and when we receive reader feedback.

"Social Security Disability SSDI FAQs"

SSDI Benefits FAQs

Here are the most frequently asked questions about the SSDI benefits when it comes to payments.

Can Social Security take away my SSDI benefits?

Yes, you can lose your disability benefits if your condition improves to the point that you no longer meet the SSA’s definition of “disabled.”

For your benefits to be taken away, the SSA must show there has been medical improvement related to your ability to work before they can cut your SSDI benefit payments.

Can I get unemployment benefits while waiting for SSDI benefits?

The issue with unemployment versus SSDI benefits is the difference in why someone receives these benefits.

When you receive SSDI, it means you are unable to do your past work or any other work.

However, unemployment benefits generally indicate you are ready, willing and able to work, but haven’t found employment yet.

Some administrative law judges (ALJs) look at your individual circumstances when determining the significance of your application for unemployment benefits and related efforts to obtain employment when determining if you qualify for SSDI.

You may put your SSDI application in danger if you have recently received unemployment benefits while at the same time applied for SSDI.

That is because your unemployment benefits mean you are saying you are willing and able to work.

Can you receive both SSI and SSDI at the same time?

Yes, it is possible to receive both SSI and SSDI simultaneously.

This situation is generally described as “concurrent benefits” and is only possible if you have already been approved for SSDI with low monthly benefits.

For SSI eligibility and income limit, click here.

What is the difference between SSI and SSDI?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) runs two different disability programs, Supplemental Security Insurance (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

The SSI program is a financial need-based program for disabled individuals who haven’t earned enough work credits to qualify for SSDI.

The SSDI program pays disability benefits to eligible workers who have earned enough work credits based on taxable employment in the past 10 years.

Here’s the main difference between the two programs:

Your eligibility for SSDI or SSI depends how long you have worked in the past 10 years.

If you have enough work credits, you can apply for SSDI.

However, if you do not have enough work credits in the last 10 years, then you may apply for SSI if eligible.

Can I get additional benefits if I have children/dependents?

Children up to age 18 or who have not graduated from high school are entitled to benefits if a parent is deceased, retired or disabled.

Generally, dependent children of a disabled parent will receive about 50% of the disabled parent’s monthly benefit.

The 50% payment is divided equally among all eligible dependents.

How hard is it to get Social Security disability benefits?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) denies 67% of the people filing initial disability applications.

In addition, the process can take a long time. On average, it can take between two to four years.

Can Social Security take away my SSDI benefits?

Yes, it can happen but does not happen often.

You can lose your disability benefits if your condition improves to the point that you no longer meet the SSA’s definition of “disabled.”

However, The SSA must show there has been medical improvement related to your ability to work before they can cease your SSDI benefits.

Can I get additional benefits if I have children/dependents?

Yes, but it depends on your circumstances.

Children up to age 18 or who have not graduated from high school are entitled to benefits if a parent is deceased, retired, or disabled.

Generally, dependent children of a disabled parent will receive an additional amount of about 50% of the disabled parent’s own monthly benefit.

However, the 50% monthly payment is divided equally among all eligible dependents.

Can I get unemployment benefits while waiting for SSDI benefits?

Receiving unemployment benefits does not necessarily prevent you from getting SSDI benefits.

However, it is a factor the Social Security Administration will consider when determining whether or not you qualify for SSDI benefits.

In addition, some administrative law judges (ALJs) may not award SSDI benefits if someone is receiving or has applied for unemployment.

Furthermore, the disability onset dates may have to be amended to the day after someone received their last unemployment check.

Another point to consider is that when you receive SSDI, it means you are unable to do your past work or any other work.

Nevertheless, receiving unemployment benefits generally means you are ready, willing, and able to work, but haven’t found employment yet.

Social Security Disability SSDI FAQs Summary

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